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First Generation Student FAQs

While the definition can be complicated, being a first-gen student means that your parents did not complete a 4-year college or university degree. Some colleges and universities use a different definition, so be sure to ask enrollment services, academic advisor, or faculty member to learn more.

    • Am I still a first-gen student if my parents started college or university and did not finish their degree?
      • If your parents took a few college classes or even completed community college, you will often be considered first-gen.
    • Am I still a first-gen student if other members of my family (step-parents siblings, grandparents) went to college or university before me?
      • Yes. Being a first-gen student means that your parent(s) did not complete a 4-year college or university degree, regardless of other family member’s level of education. Older siblings and family members who attended college may be a great resource as you navigate your college journey!
    • Am I still a first-gen student if my parents received a degree from a college or university located outside of the United States?
      • Many colleges and universities are beginning to consider students with parents who attended international universities as first-gen. We suggest contacting BYU Enrollment Services, or a trusted person on your campus to learn more.

    www.firstgen.naspa.org

  • When a student is accepted to attend an Undergraduate University, they usually do so for the purpose of earning a bachelor’s degree. This is typically a four-year degree earned in the major you choose to declare at this University. At BYU we have a few types of bachelor’s degrees, a Bachelor of Arts, a Bachelor of Fine Arts, a Bachelor of General Studies, a Bachelor of Music, and a Bachelor of Science. Usually which type you earn is determined based on which major you have selected to pursue.

    Liberal Arts Majors
    BYU Undergraduate Majors

    MYMAP Plan Tab
    This tool allows you to see how many courses you have completed in your major/minor. The link “Explore Other Majors and Minors” in the Tools box on the bottom left of MyMAP also allows you to see how many courses you have completed in another major/minor you are considering

  • A major is a specific subject area that students specialize in. BYU students must select and declare a major by the time they have 60 earned BYU credit hours (excluding language exam credits). It is a good idea to have a concrete idea by the end of your second year at BYU. Selecting a major by your sophomore year should not delay your graduation or compromise your ability to enter and progress in the major of your choice (including most limited enrollment programs).
    BYU Majors
    Liberal Arts Majors

    Not sure what to major in? Below are things to consider and information to help you decide.

    Things to Consider:

    • What are you interested in learning about?
    • How will a particular major help you to go forth and serve?
    • What foundation will it provide for your plans after graduation (your career and/or grad school)?
    • “A major will not predict or guarantee your future” (Princeton Review).
    • A major can help you gain the competencies, skills, and experiences for success in life and career.
    • There are no “easy” majors. Every major will include challenges and opportunities to help students grow and learn skills.


    MYMAP Plan Tab
    This tool allows you to see how many courses you have completed in your major/minor. The link “Explore Other Majors and Minors” in the Tools box on the bottom left of MyMAP also allows you to see how many courses you have completed in another major/minor you are considering

  • This is a major that requires an application and admittance to the program before you can declare it as your major. A list of the majors included can be found on the following website: BYU Limited Enrollment Programs

  • A minor is not required at BYU. A minor is a course of study you can add to your major if you choose to do so. A minor can be a good way to round out your education at BYU. To graduate from BYU you need to complete 120 credit hours, most majors + GE + required religion hours do not = 120 and so some students choose to add a minor to their major to focus on those extra credits they are taking. Visit with your advisor to discuss adding a minor if this option interests you. A list of available minors can be found at the following links:
    BYU Minors
    Liberal Arts Minors